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is it? >> guest: where is the ranch? it's on the arizona-new mexico border. the ranch was half in each state, along the gila river--to the south side of the gila river and to the top of the peloncillo mountain range. it's a high desert area. it's rather arid and sparse. there are some oak trees and mesquite trees on the higher elevations. and it's high desert; it's about 5,000 feet high, even on the flat part. but it's--it has a fairly decent climate: rarely gets below freezing in the winter; it gets fairly hot in the summer, but not unbearably so. c-span: how long did you live on that ranch? >> guest: well, i live on it from childhood until i went away to school and eventually got married. my brother, who wrote it with me, lived on it always, until it was sold. and my father ran it until his death--lived on it. and it was started in 1880 by his father. so it had been in the family 113 years by the time it was sold. c-span: how big was it? >> guest: it was very large. it was close to 300 square miles. that's a large area. but, of course, you have to realize that grass is very sparse in
, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks the senate will be in a period of morning business until 11:30 this morning. republicans will control the first 30 minutes, majority controlling the second 30 minutes. following morning business we'll resume consideration of s. 3637. the filing deadline for second-degree amendments to that legislation is 10:30 today. at noon there will be up to two roll call votes, first on the motion to waive the budget act if a point of order is raised. if the motion is successful there will be a second roll call vote on the motion to invoke cloture on the bill. i'm confident there will be additional votes this afternoon on judicial nominations. we'll keep everyone advised as to the time. mr. president, a poll this morning in the "wall street journal" which case it was -- which indicates it was done by the "wall street journ
from fort leavenworth in kansas to new mexico, conquering new mexico to california. that happens about the same time. neither of these tremendously to restrain what polk wants, which is peace and the securing of california and texas into the american union. mexico refuses to surrender despite the fact trees of both taylor and carney. the poked pope is jesus and winfield scott to invade central mexico. he bombards veracruz and travels through central mexico securing the capital of the fall of 1847. now in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a foregone conclusion that there sideway because most u.s. citizens harbored a host of racist police of mexican men. foremost among them being mexican men were too lazy and cowardly to fight. in point of fact, mexican troops but very hard as you can see in this print, mexico produces few images of the were so it's great when you find them so you can get a sense of how their envisioning this happening. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimately lost the military side of the war because they had vastly inferior weapons. their leadership was terr
narrative that export help people in the united states in new mexico, hellebore impacted them and their families abraham lincoln makes his first major political speech that i found to be quite widely documented in disgust in newspapers. it's condemning the war. the first political stance on the national stage is actually against the u.s. mexico or. another person i talked about is john j. horgan who saw of you may be familiar with, part of a very important family in jacksonville. and for a time he was leading with politician in the state of illinois. this is hard instead that the u.s.-mexico war that have made lincoln's path forward possible because he was under the shadow of john harden before that happened. "italian little bit about the war. the north american invasion began when president james k. polk sent troops into a disputed area between the new lenses and rio grande rivers with the intention of starting a war he wanted war. he was sent on this -- declaring war. the day before he found out that mexicans have crossed the rio grande and killed 14 soldiers in this dispute
through new mexico, all the way to california. and unfortunately, neither of these tremendous victories bring what polk wants, which is peace in the securing of california and texas into the union. mexico refuses to surrender, despite the victories. so polk decides to invade central mexico. and he bombards veracruz and travel throughcentral mexico, securing the capital in the fall of 1847. in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a poor pollution that their side would win. and win easily. most u.s. citizens harbored racist beliefs about mexican man. foremost being that they were cowardly to fight. in fact, mexican troops fought hard come, as you can see in this rare print. you can actually get a sense of what their rendition wasn't what was happening. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimately lost the military side of the board because they had interior weapons and their leadership was terrible. mexico's government was internal. they were broke. there were various battles where there were no money. the army was supporting itself. because hostile american tribes in new mexico had s
from new mexico. mr. bingaman: mr. president, i'd ask that the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. bingaman: in 181, in his first inaugural address, president reagan said -- quote -- "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." i came to the senate two years later in 1983 with the firm belief that in most cases his statement was wrong. i believed then and i believe now that the federal government can be a constructive force for good in protecting and maintaining the civil liberties of all americans, in maintaining and strengthening our economy, in he can prosecuting our environment -- in protecting our environment and in helping americans live product tiffed and fulfilling lives. as i luke back over the last -- as i look back over the last 30 years, many of the arguments that have consumed our time here in the senate, whether on questions of spending or taxes or regulation or fiscal policy, those questions have divided between those who saw government as the problem and those who believed that it could an
principles of good government: liberty, people and politics." it's written by former new mexico governor gary johnson, and he is also the libertarian party nominee for president in 2012. governor johnson, when and why did you leave the republican party and become a libertarian? >> guest: well, you know, i've probably been a libertarian my entire life, so this is kind of coming out of the closet. [laughter] and i don't think i'm unlike most americans. i think there are a hot more americans in this country that declare themselves libertarian as opposed to voting libertarian. so, you know, the pitch that i'm trying to make right now is vote libertarian with me just this one time. give me a shot at changing things. and if it doesn't work out, you can always return toty, and i'm going to argue that that's what we have right now. >> host: what are those seven principles of good government that you write about? >> guest: well, one is being reality-based, just find out what's what, base your decisions on that, make sure everybody that knows, that should know what you doing knows what you're doing, so
, indeed, and the official state nickname of new mexico is land of enchantment, carrying a whiff of new aged mysticism with it and makes it glowy and warm and fuzzy and tends to obscure a much more complicated reality, and, ultimately, that's what desert american's about, how we imagine the desert or how it's imagined for us by the many arctic tis representations that -- artistic representations that created a vision of the desert for us that's consumed, bought, and sold, the stage upon real estate being sold and hotels and stays in hotels, and tourist packages, ect., and how complicated the actual human geography of the place is. there's imagined place and there's the lived place. i'm going to take you to northern new mexico briefly here. angela chose northern new mexico. she's from central new mexico, and both of the families have issues with addiction, and that was another point of end counter between us. she chose northern knack, i -- northern new mexico, i think, not to be right next door to her family, but close enough to visit often, and, also, because northern new mexico, there'
'm going to take a few minutes today to honor my colleague, the senior senator from new mexico, jeff bingaman, as he retires from a long career of service to our country. for 30 years, senator bingaman has been a dedicated representative of the people of new mexico, but for those -- for 26 of those years, he was a junior senior from new mexico. the only person that i know of that was a junior senator longer than senator bingaman was fritz hollings. he was a junior senator for many, many decades to strom thurmond. but 26 years here in the senate still makes you a fairly senior member. jeff served alongside senator pete domenici, the longest serving senator in new mexico's history, until in 2009 he was the most senior junior senator. still, mr. president, jeff bingaman has never been one to get hung up on titles or credits. if there were ever the conscience of this body, it's jeff bingaman, a man who has been called by others, including by ron dorgan, a -- including byron dorgan, a workhorse. that's really true. for three decades, he has quietly and with dignity fought for the people o
might grated from, say, california, texas, new mexico, because of job opportunities in arizona over the last decade or so. but that's not unlike perhaps the white population, too. it's very hard to find native arizonans. so, a lot of the people there are transplants from elsewhere and i think that explains a lot as to why the latino voters are still the sleeping giant in arizona. we saw them surge in new mexico and of course colorado and nevada, but in arizona they're still asleep some people ask why. i think in part it's because they have not established rooting, the roots in the community like in, say, california or texas. >> go into the numbers a little bit. what percentage of the population -- we heard the percentage of electorate. give us a sense of the percentage of the population, what they -- growth rate, expansion. >> in arizona, approximately one-third of the population are hispanic background. but when we take into consideration the qualifications to vote, the voting age population, only have 25% eligible to vote in terms of being over 18. but of that population, one-thir
, the south value -- new mexico, from the south valley. we lived in new mexico together while she did research on addiction for her research paper. we have stapp ford people remitting here -- we have stanford people representing here tonight. [laughter] i followed her on to another land scape, northern new mexico, which i'd already seen. i had been there a couple times as a tourist when i was younger, but we've seen new mexico remitted arian tis -- artistically whether it's a
't visited us got a chapter about the development of the atom bomb and a lot of that took place in new mexico and in particular was very exciting true story of espionage down in new mexico. santa fe apparently is crawling with fbi agents. everybody knew because they were all wearing tweed jackets. but anyway, there is some serious s. ganache going on, so that's great drama for me. so i just like to walk around the streets. i find that very helpful. >> i wondered when i came to the mirrors entry materials and buffalo issue actually went to buffalo. >> i went a couple of times to buffalo. the other thing is buffalo features than 100 years ago was a very different place from what it's like today. nevertheless i went there in the round, but i got a hold of old maps and the buffalo bluebook, which was the list of high society in town and at newspapers published at the time and so on. go in and walking around is never enough. >> give you a feel for the place. >> and doing research is one thing if it's your own research, but are you able to do all of your own research and a book like this? >> i have
surging in new mexico of course, and, of course, colorado and nevada. but in arizona they are still asleep and people ask why. i think in part because they have not established the roots, the risen the community like latino populations have been, say, california or texas. >> do with the numbers a bit. what percentage of the population, what percentage of elected they made it this time around. give us a sense of the percentage of the population, the growth rates, the expansion. >> in arizona, approximately one-third of the population are hispanic background. but when we take into consideration qualifications to go, you only have 25% that are eligible to vote in terms of being over 18. but of the population, one-third are disqualified from participating in an election because of their citizenship status. so that whittles the numbers dramatically, so you really own have about 15% of the electora electorate, of the rush of voters being hispanic. >> what are the projections for, say, the next two decades or so? will they become, with a double in the national voting bloc? what are they doing? >>
in new mexico. he writes for for "the new york times" and the interesting thing is he never heard how angry the president was so there were no repercussions to his career so that was his five minutes of fame. >> he is likely -- lucky because -- moving to alaska. [laughter] >> one of the things that i hate most about this duty is having to call a hault to the proceedings, but i have to. and and i hope we have given you enough to realize that those the book and the cds inside are goldmines. please enjoy them and thank you very much for coming. [applause] >> "500 days" and the author is kurt eichenwald. he joins us here at the national press club. mr. eichenwald what are the 500 days you referred to? >> well this is a book about the period of time between 9/11 and the beginning of the iraq war. the reason i am covering that is, this is the period when all the major decisions were made in terms of policy -- international policy around the world, about how the west was going to respond to al qaeda and the 9/11 attacks. >> so when it comes to president bush, vice president cheney, how proac
most popular and respected members, senator jeff bingaman of new mexico. when jeff came to this body 30 years ago, he had already led a life of accomplishment created in small-town new mexico, silver city. he was an eagle scout, graduated from harvard college, stanford law school, where he met his future wife, ann. while at stanford, he worked in senator robert f. kennedy's campaign for president. at the age of 35, he was elected new mexico attorney general in 1978. and four years later at the age of 39, elected to the united states senate. during his three decades in this body, jeff bingaman has been a classic workhorse senator as opposed to being a show horse senator. he is truly remarkable and distinctive among senators for his willingness to shun the limelight and share the credit in order to get important things done for his state and for this country. senator bingaman has been a much valued colleague of mine on the health, education, labor and pensions committee, but he has really made his mark in the senate a lasting mark in his role as chair of the energy and natural resources c
, in fact, there's a museum in new mexico i'm told, i think i mention it in the book, i forget, where they have one of these bombs. something about the museum of the nuclear age or something like that in new mexico where they have one of these. obviously, everything out of it, it's just the outside. the four bombs came down with their parachutes. one of them we couldn't find for several months. there was a spanish fisherman francisco port, probably from, i think he came from the next down down, a fishermen's town. the town grew tomatoes. that's basically what they did. this guy, paco, called him paco the bomb guy, he kept saying i know exactly where the fourth bomb is. the u.s. navy didn't listen to him. they had 20 ships there by this time. they were checking the bottom of 120 square miles of the mediterranean. ten by 12 miles, and they couldn't locate the bomb. he said, i know exactly where it is. they didn't want to listen to him. what does he know? a guy who goes out fishing every day knows exactly where he is like you know you are sitting in your seat, and i know i'm standing up
. mr. leahy: madam president, i see the distinguished senior senator from new mexico on the floor, and i would yield to him. the presiding officer: the senator from new mexico. mr. bingaman: i thank my colleague, senator leahy. i would -- madam president, what is *t pending business before the senate now? is it an amendment to this legislation? the presiding officer: amendment number 3371 is the pending business. mr. bingaman: madam president, i'd ask that that amendment be set aside and that i be permitted to call up amendment number 3344 and ask for its immediate consideration. the presiding officer: without objection. the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: the senator from new mexico, mr. bingaman, proposes an amendment numbered 3344. mr. bingaman: i'd ask that further reading of the amendment be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. bingaman: madam president, this is an amendment offered by myself and cosponsored by senators webb and wyden. it would provide for the approval of an agreement between the united states and the republic of palau in
westward supported by the slave holding south and to invade the new mexico territory. there were many other parts of the crisis with or not the last would be free. in 1850 the south was mother eternized, southern nationalism was at the peak. jefferson davis in 1850 said if the southern confederacy was to be formed now it was ready to accept the presidency of its. the north on the other hand was nowhere near ready to go to war and indeed still dominated by the conservative wing of the democratic party allowed largely with the south and in other words the norm wouldn't have fought the war matt or the same war and secession would have succeeded and the consequences of that not only for the american history but for the rest of the world would have been quite tragic. >> what was the floor of congress like in 1850? status tunnell to this, chaotic, intense. aid debate in congress was like the world series today. which there was no sports culture in the mid 19th century. politics was the great american sport. americans came from all over the country to attend the debate especially when the titans l
appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties f the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader is recognized. mr. reid: following leader remarks, which will be in a period of morning business until 11:45 today. senators will be permitted to speak for up to ten minutes each. we would like that time to be for speeches for our retiring senators. at 11:45, the senate will move to consider the nominations of walker and berg, judges. we expect only two roll call votes since we hope the berg nomination will be confirmed by voice. mr. president, we democrats have been saying for more than four months, it's time for the thousands pass a middle-class tax cut which we approved here in the senate in july. as the days until the country goes over the fiscal cliff goes by, more and more republicans have joined our chorus. they recognize that the willing misto compromise sooner has put them in a real bind. so reasonable republicans are asking the house leadership to allow a vot
with whom i had the honor to serve these past two years, senator jeff bingaman of new mexico, chairman of the energy committee. simply one of the kindest, smartest, gentlest people i've ever met. it's been a great pleasure working with him on the energy and natural resources committee. i remember we were both speaking at a conference on advanced energy research this last year out at national harbor. thousands of scientists, investors and entrepreneurs were there. i pulled up in front of the massive convention hall and right out in front, prius with new mexico plates. sure enough, chairman jeff bingaman jumps out of the driver's seat -- no staff -- so here's the chairman of the senate energy committee, a senator for nearly 30 years, driving himself to a major policy speech in his prius. practicing what he preaches, prepared to deliver an important speech in a moment that showed his humility. as unassuming a man as senator bingaman is, when he speaks, you listen. he's living proof that the value of one's words can and should exceed their volume. that day at national harbor, senator binga
new mexico asks the senator from nebraska to yield. mr. johanns: i will. the presiding officer: the senator. mr. udall: the senator from nebraska has talked about the rules not being able to be changed because internally in the senate rules, there is a provision that says you need a supermajority, two-thirds of the senate to change the rules. so this is the proposition that we are hearing argued by many senators that we're changing the rules to break the rules. breaking the rules to change the rules. we have heard that repeated several times over and over again on the senate floor. now, the other side of the argument, as the senator i think well knows since he worked up here and was around and saw senator bird, is that the constitution is superior to the senate rules, and the constitution specifically says that article 1, section 5, that each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, and statutory production applied to that means simple majority, determine the rules of its proceedings. this is a standard interpretation construction, and we know that supermajorities are
degree from the university of california in 1973 and graduated from the university of new mexico school of law in 1976. judge grimm was admitted to the maryland bar in 1977. he has strong roots, legal experience and community involvement in the state of maryland. judge grimm lives with his family in towson, maryland. judge grimm began his legal career after graduating law school back in maryland as a captain of the united states army judge advocate corps at aberdeen proving grounds in maryland. he worked at the pentagon before heading back to the baltimore region alternating working in private practice and working in the state's attorney general's office, while continuing to serve as an active duty u.s. army j.a.g. corps officer with occasional stints in the pentagon. in 1997, judge grimm was elected a magistrate judge by the judges of the u.s. district court for the district of maryland and in 2006 became the chief u.s. magistrate judge in baltimore. in 2009, chief justice john roberts appointed judge grimm to serve as a member of the advisory committee for the federal rules of civil p
in northern new mexico has the highest rate of heroin addiction and death from overdose of heroin of anywhere in the country. and has for a long time. and the problem is not getting better, it's getting worse. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> the white house was very controversial as most things in america were. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. neither large, nor awe-inspiring. but the answer the congressman gave said the purpose, if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. watch tonight at 7:30 eastern and pacific on c-span3's american history the. tv. >> next, william silver and former federal reserve chairman paul volcker talk about mr. volcker's life and years of government service. it's about an hour and a half. [applause] >> that was very nice. you didn't tell me there were so many people here. so i have a sneaky suspicion that you're not here just to listen to me, so i'm going to be very brief, 13 minutes on a
workers doing those kinds of jobs to be the best they can be. >> host: farmington, new mexico, republican caller. >> caller: this is smitty from farmington, new mexico. what a wonderful time. miss sawhill your information is sew outdated it is incredible. if you want to know how much we waste, a guy up in the northwest, won a lottery, took home $800,000 cash and went down to his local food stamp office, told him that he won the money. they said he still qualified for food stamps. these people are nuts. the federal government probably has a minimum, very minimum, i've worked for government and i worked in the utility inindustry which is almost the same as working for government, at least 40% overpaid, at least, too many people working. at least 40% more people than they need to do the job. it actually incredible. when people say they're cutting budget. they're not cutting darn thing. they're cutting growth in government. congress doesn't vote themselves raises anymore. they get automatic raise unless somebody has the gonads saying wait a minute we don't need to have a raise this year. thin
-way street where senator udall of new mexico and berkeley and harkin of iowa have ideas out there that don't have balance to them, don't provide enough rice for the minority power to make it possible. >> i would say first, look at the proposal of the carl levin put out a few months ago when the record and you'll see it. as a starting point and something that had been discussed in a bipartisan way in the senate rules committee to several hearings on the filibuster over the last couple of years. chuck schumer, chairman of the committee, lamar alexander, ranking republican talked about the idea of a trade-off disseminating filibusters on the motion to proceed in return for some guarantee of amendments. senator levin's proposal is fairly specific in how that could work. i think you could use that as a starting point and agree to the changes in the week much like what happened in 19785. as part of the agreement that they put in while five for the first time. we came this close by were not going to do it. but when you put that in the posts. peer the other possibility is to get another handshake
of new mexico and merkley and harkin of iowa all have ideas out there that don't have balance and don't provide enough rights for the minority power to make it plausible. >> i would say first look at the proposal that carl levin put out at the end, a few months ago. it's in the record. you will see it. as a starting point but it's something that had been discussed in a bipartisan way in the senate rules committee through several hearings on the filibuster over the last couple of years. chuck schumer, the chairman of the committee, lamar alexander, the ranking republican, and others are least talked about the idea of a trade off, limiting filibusters on the motion to proceed in return for some guarantee of amendments. and senator levin's proposal is fairly specific and how that could work. i think you could use that as a starting point and then maybe agree to some of the changes. and that would be very much like what happened in 1975. it was part of the agreement was that they put in rule five for the first time. it had never been there. okay, came this close but we're not going to do.
new mexico for five minutes. mr. udall: mr. president -- and thank you, senator kerry, for the recognition, and, mr. president, really appreciate it. i've been an early supporter of the ratification of this important treaty, and i'm pleased to have been able to work with senators durbin, mccain, harkin, moran, coons, and barrasso and in particular want to say thank you to the chairman and the ranking member on the foreign relations committee. i thank all of these fine senators for their bipartisan work on this bill. we still have work to do to improve our treatment and acceptance of disabled persons, but through the americans with disabilities act, the united states has been at the forefront of protecting the dignity of people with disabilities. this treaty will help expand american values and leadership throughout the world. it is a vital step forward in respecting the rights of the disabled. as a member of the foreign relations committee, i am aware of the challenges that many countries face. these challenges include supporting their disabled citizens. our nation has
't the senator from arizona -- i'm going to hold off on that if i may. but they recognize the senator from new mexico for five minutes. >> mr. president, thank you, senator kerry for the recognition and mr. president, and really appreciated. i've been an early supporter of the ratification of this important treaty and i'm pleased to have been able to work with senators durbin, mccain, harkin, moran, koons and barrasso in particular want to stay thank you to the chairman and raking member of the foreign relations committee. i think all of these fine senators for their bipartisan work on this bill. we still have work to do to improve our treatment and acceptance of disabled persons. through the americans with disabilities act, the united states has been at the forefront of protecting the dignity of people with disabilities. this review will help expand american values and leadership throughout the world. it is a vital step forward in respecting the rights of the disabled. as a member of the foreign relations committee, i'm aware of the challenges of many countries face. these challenges include
officer: the senator from new mexico. without objection. mr. bingaman: i give back all remaining time and ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a tough time? there appears to be a sufficient second. there is a sufficient second. the question is on dpoirnlation of the shea nomination and the clerk will call the will call t. vote: vote: vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators in the chamber wishing to vote or to change their vote? if not, on this vote the ayes are 72, the nays are 23, and the nomination is confirmed. under the -- under the previous order, the motion to reconsider is considered made and laid upon the table. the president will be immediately informed of the senate's action, and the senate will resume legislative session. the senator from michigan. mr. levin: mr. president, the russia pntr bill is before us. it takes a long overdue action by ending the application of jackson-vanik sanctions to russia. jackson-vanik is no longer relevant to russia because russia no longer restricts the free emigration of its people. the soviet union be
. >> host: republican caller. >> caller: this is schmidt e. from farmington, new mexico. what a wonderful time to get in. you are so outdated is incredible. if anybody wants to know how much money we waste, we just recently had a guy in the northwest who won a lottery, took him $800,000 cash and went to his local food stamp office, told them he wanted money and he said he still qualified for food stamps. these people are nuts. the federal government has a minimum -- and i've worked with the utility industry promotion psalmist famous working for government at least 40%, to many people, then they need to do this job. it's absolutely incredible. they're not cutting a current team. they're cutting the the growth of government. congress doesn't vote themselves raises. they get automatic raises unless somebody has the to stand up and say we don't need to have a raise this year. they haven't done that since they put that into effect. they don't vote anymore. >> host: let's get a response. >> guest: i'm sorry i don't agree with all of your taxpayer. one can find instances of fraud and waste in th
administration and the mayor of new mexico. -- t.j. the town has a number of businesses that have not reopened since the storm. live coverage starts at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >>> my inspiration was the idea i wanted to explain how deal it happened. we do know the story of the cold war, we know that the documents, we have seen the archives and described relationships between roosevelt and stalin and churchill and true man. we know the main event from our point of view. we read them and written them. what i wantedded to do was show from a different angle from the ground up bhap did it feel like to be one of the people who were subjected to this system and how did people make choices in that system and how did they react and behave. it's interesting one of the thing that happened since 19789 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become differentiated. it's no longer these countries no longer have much in common with one another except the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with the pulitzer prize winner ann on life in soviet east germany from the end of world w
quorum call: quorum call: quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from new mexico. mr. udall: thank you, mr. president. i would ask for the quorum call to be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. udall: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, i wanted to come down and talk about an amendment that i'm working on on the defense authorization bill. last week, senator corker and i introduced amendment numbered 3049 which would create an open pit -- open burn pit registry to the defense authorization act. our veterans and active duty members suffering from exposure to burn pits should not have to wait any longer. the senate veterans affairs committee agrees and has passed the legislation after holding hearings. however, i understand there is currently opposition to passing this amendment via a manager's package. i would note that we have already passed two amendments dealing with veterans yesterday. both the pryor amendment 3291 dealing with veterans employment and training and the reed of rhode island amendment 3165 dealing with housing assistance for vet
. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new mexico. mr. bingaman: are we in a quorum call, mr. president? the presiding officer: we are not. mr. bingaman: mr. president, earlier today, the senate voted to grant permanent normal trade relations to russia by a vote of 92-4 and i strongly supported that bill. to extend pntr to russia, we had to repeal an out-of-date policy that was adopted during the cold war. that is, the jackson-vanik amendment. i want to speak briefly on the senate floor this afternoon about another out-of-date policy of the cold war that i believe should be ended, and that is the trade embargo on cuba. i have spoken about this many times in the past, along with senator pell, senator dodd and many others. i argued against the helms-burton act in 1996. for the past 50 years, our country's policy toward cuba has been essentially stagnant. the core element of our policy, our foreign policy, which is the embargo, has authorized in a proclamation signed by president kennedy on february 3, 1962. that's 51 years ago. at that time, president kennedy justified the emba
with the rules committee dominated by the majority. that is it. >> host: roger in new mexico, a few minutes left. >> i will try to be quick. the senator reminds me of my grandparents in oklahoma. save lives by the rule of two wrongs don't make a right. i think that is a good solid rule to live by. i remember reading in a book called aftershock about two dangers facing america. one of them is the debt situation, the death bomb, the only thing supporting the u.s. dollar is the fact that it is the world's reserve currency. the day that is gone is the day the dollar is gone. becomes worthless paper. would you care to comment about that? >> guest: you are accurate in your assessment of that. you heard some discussion this past summer of the chinese and several others thinking of creating another reserve currency or at least using currency denominated in the you want to be treated. it is very critical. the world reserve currency, we started undermining this in 1971 when we went off of the gold standard and as we printed money, through the last four years we have made that quite worse. i would go to yo
, arkansas and louisiana and new mexico, that's one, 3rbgs two, three, four, five states, received 68 disaster declarations and almost $40 billion in disaster assistance. for five states, $40 billion. we have more than five states, many more here, asking for $150 million. as the senator from maryland has pointed out. the distinction is so clear. i just say point blank, this legislation is not going to pass without the inclusion of this fishery money, point blank and period. i thank the senator from rhode island would agree with me. mr. whitehouse: i'd be delegated to -- delighted to agree with the senator from massachusetts. our fisheries disaster as the senator from maryland declared, this is a declared, this is not a maybe, it's a declaration of the united states government. it's the multispecies ground fish disaster that affected the state of massachusetts and great leadership from senator kerry on all of this and affected the state of new hampshire and great leadership from senator shaheen on all of this. governors of rhode island, of massachusetts, of maine, of new hampshire, of
of this year at the conclusion of the 112th congress -- daniel akaka of hawaii, jeff bingaman of new mexico, scott brown of massachusetts, kent conrad of north dakota, jim demint of south carolina, kay bailey hutchison of texas, herb kohl of wisconsin, jon kyl of arizona, joseph lieberman of connecticut, richard lugar of indiana, ben nelson of nebraska, olympia snowe of maine, and jim webb of virginia. they have all worked ceaselessly to give their constituents the best representation and give the country the benefit of their views, their wisdom and their experiences. they're men and women who are committed to the nation and they have every day in different ways contributed to this senate and to our great country. and i want to thank them personally for their service and in so many cases their personal kindness to me. to listen to my points and to -- together hopefully serve this senate and this nation in a more positive and progressive way. in particular let me say a few words about some of the members who i had the privilege to work with very closely. senator daniel akaka, had who like hi
, jeff bingaman, of new mexico, someone who's always brought intellectual rigor, a lawyer's insistence on thoroughness and a real commitment to people. it's been an honor and a pleasure to work with him on the help committee, especially on the affordable care act. i was proud to support him all that he did, particularly in developing and focusing on the health work force for the future. i knew i could count on jeff in the committee and on the floor as one of those men that i refer to as the ga gallahads, where mn of quality always support we women as we sought equality. our initiatives to end discrimination against women in the health care and in the workplace were some of our proudest achievements in working together. i also would like to comment about jon kyl. i've worked across the aisle from jon kyl and i've been seated across the table from him at everything from bible study group to the senate intelligence committee. we studied the words of the bible together to make ourselves better and we worked in our committees to make the world better. we lived through september 11th and the
time. is that correct? >> yes. >> mr. chairman, will the commission commit to negotiating new arrangements with the state department, canada and mexico as mentioned in paragraph 34 of the commission's notice of proposed rulemaking before repacking broadcast frequencies, yes or no? is. >> i'm not sure of that provision, but we are committed to working with canada and mexico. >> is that a yes or no? >> i'd have to look at that provision to give an accurate answer. >> the law requires you to do it. >> we will comply with the law. >> i hope so. [laughter] mr. chairman, section 6403b2 of the spectrum act requires the commission to, quote: make all reasonable efforts to preserve as of the date of the enactment of this act the coverage area and population served of each broadcast licensee as determined using the methodology described in oet bulletin 69 of the office of engineering and technology. does the commission intend to define explicitly what such reasonable efforts will constitute, yes or no? >> yes. that's part of our decision. >> mr. chairman, does the commission expect to h
, and several weeks ago, covenant house in philadelphia led a coalition that successfully championed new safe harbor legislation that helped victims of sex trafficking, and that would be true throughout the united states, and worse in latin america, working in mexico, guatemala, and honduras, we work directly including co-prosecuting the cases against the gangs and cartels trafficking kids who are as young as six, seven, eight, nine, ten years old. the work we do to help vick -- victims recover depends where the victim is on their exploitation and suffering but involves councilling, dealing with rape and exploitation, and develop a plan forward that's not very different than the work that we were doing, you know, 30 years ago. we call it trafficking now, but it's been going on for a long time. kids have been getting bought and sold in this country for a long time, and we worked for a long time helping kids move from exploitation to hope and opportunity. >> another thing we advocate for is for the resources to be better educate the for when someone is actually a victim and someone is there on
that successfully championed new safe harbor legislation that helps victims of sex trafficking. that would be true throughout the united states and of course in latin america where covenant houseworks in mexico, nicaragua and guatemala. in honduras we work very directly including we coprosecute cases against gangs and cartels trafficking kids as young as 6, 7, 8, programs. the work we do to help victims recover depends where that victim is in terms of their exploitation and their suffering. but it almost always involves psychiatric counseling. helping young people begin to deal with rape and exploitation. and help them build a plan forward. that is not very different than the work that we were doing, 30 years ago when kids, we call it trafficking now but it's been going on for a long time. kids have been getting bought and sold in this country for a long time and we've been working helping kids move from exploitation to hope and opportunity. >> another thing we've been advocating for the police forces to be better educated as to when somebody is actually a victim of trafficking and when someone is
begun in charleston but it would have begun in santa fe, new mexico. why? because texas was its own imperial ambitions, westward supported by the slaveholding south, aimed to invade the new mexico territory. there were many other parts to the crisis. fundamentally in this was not the west would be slaves or free. in 1850, the south was military i, other nationalism was at a peak. jefferson davis on the floor of the senate in 1850 said if they southern confederacy was to be formed now, he was ready to accept the presidency of the, in 1850. the north on the other hand was nowhere near ready to go to war. and, indeed, the north still dominated by the conservative wing of the democratic party, largely with the south, in other words, the north would not have fought the war, or certainly would not thought the same or, secession probably would have succeeded. and the consequences of that, not only for american history but for the rest of the world, could've been quite tragic. >> what was the floor of congress like in 1850? >> it was tumultuous, chaotic, intense. a debate in congress was li
, senator mccain, no longer wishes to offer amendment 3384 so senator bingaman of new mexico is in line to offer the next amendment under the -- in order under the agreement and i see he is here now to call up his amendment and now we will proceed to debating amendments where there were more extensive time asked. but i ask members not to leave the chambers. these are four minutes of debate, ten minutes of debate, and if we all stick together for a change, we can all move this bill in a way that we can be proud of. madam president, i now yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from new mexico. mr. bingaman: madam president, i thank the manager of the bill, the chairman of the appropriations committee. at the same time that hurricane sandy -- first i call up amendment 3344. the presiding officer: without objection, the clerk will report. the clerk: senator new mexico, mr. bingaman for himself and others proposes an amendment numbered 3344. mr. bingaman: madam president, i ask that further reading be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. bingaman: as hur
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